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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in a critical battle ground state. >>> a judge blocking part of pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. law. opponents said the law was aimed at stopping minorities and the elderly from casting ballots. >> my sense is that the republicans did this to beat obama. >> supporters argued it was hadn't to stop fraud. >> no one will be disenfranchised by the fraud. >> tonight what this decision means for the presidential election. >>> plus, trouble in the seats. seats coming loose on american airlines jets. >> my son's seat was kind of like almost falling off. we were trying to push it in and hold it in. >> i think the faa needs to look at this incident. >> now planes grounded and serious questions about safety. >>> and when this ball player stepped to the plate for the first time in the majors, a wild pitch knocked him down. >> i didn't get out away enough and it caught up under my helmet. >> now seven years later, one team is giving him another chance. tonight adam greenberg back in the big leagues. i'm bill hemmer in for shepard smith. one of the toughest voter i.d. laws in the country cannot t
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
or back voter suppression laws. there's no in between. you're for the changing demographics or you're not. >> you think you can win that group via policy. it feels to me the dream act policy, it gets us focused on as we talk about all these numbers what does it mean for actual people? i'll give you the last word on this. that fiscal clip is looking to us like is that sequestration cn 1.4 million jobs. >> whether it's in the business world or personal world, the amount of money you generate by having these people as raul says, start to pay taxes. it's an enormous boone to this economy to get these people start putting into the government what they are getting out of it. >> it makes all the difference. >> yes. >> it's a good transition on this. in all the news this week, you may have lost what happened on monday when columnist george will said that president obama is likely to be re-elected because america is unwilling to fire its first black president? my dear george letter is next. [ scratching ] you're not using too much are you, hon? ♪ nope. [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft is
studies election law, it is great to be in a state where you see presidential candidates campaigning. because of our electoral college system, most of the country nowadays, it is a small number of states that get virtually all of the attention. we are either the beneficiaries are the victims, depending on your perspective. you cannot turn on the television in ohio without seeing a campaign advertisement, including many presidential advertisements, without being hit by a motorcade. in your station, channel 10, at 5:30 in the morning there is a six minute commercial break and in those minutes six different commercial ads ran. at what point is there a law of diminishing returns? guest: if your campaign has the money, you cannot go quiet. i think he would be at a disadvantage, if they go dark. more importantly, to answer the question, the vote in ohio is today, this week. these candidates are doing everything that they can, restructuring to some degree. mitt romney and the president talking directly to the camera, making their appeal. i think that dan is right. this is one of five states
. the law that people marched and died for. the law that is now under attack by voter i.d. laws. the supreme court may decide whether key revisions should stand nearly five decades later. how do justices rule in these cases will affect millions of americans. who can go to college, who can get married, who can vote. that's why this election is so important. whoever is elected president next month will likely appoint at least just one new justice to the court and it's no mystery what a romney supreme court would look like. here's what he said back in december during the primary debates. >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito, and scalia. >> those are four justices that are the most conservative on the bench. they all ruled against abortion rights, against equal pay, and for unlimited political donation for corporations. yes, this is not about who likes the president or not. sure he's likeable. this is not about all of the side bar issues. this is about what we fundamentally stand
of six best legislators. every single law was passed in a bipartisan manner, with a republican governor, republican senate, democratic house. i have always worked together in a bipartisan manner. that is the value of my record. when you are looking at these two candidates, this is a person who has never been elected to anything. mr. cruz. i have a record you can look at. bipartisan record that you can look at. >> this election is a clear choice between the obama democrats, more spending, more debt, more government control, and going back to our founding freedoms. >> we need to get out of here. because we are out of time. thank you as always. >> thank you and thank you to both candidates. we want to leave you with a final note -- early voting begins oct. 22. just three weeks from now. the election is november 6. that does it for the belo debate from victory park in dallas. for all of us, have a good night, everybody. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> see the debate tomorrow night, and watch and engage. comi
a public records request in mexico, using their public records law. we got thousands and thousands of serial numbers of seizures of the defense ministry of weapons they had seized. they took those serial numbers and compared them to the serial numbers of a list of fast and furious guns that they also obtained and we got 96 exact matches. then we took those 96 exact matches sw cross referenced them with the list of around 122 guns that congress had and also serial numbers that the mexican government had made available through press releases. and we got that number, 57 unknown weapons. >> you also conclude d that mexican officials knew about fast and furious long before they admitted it. >> yes. we found that through sources and documentation, there was a mexican justice official station in the atf phoenix field division, atf office that ran fast and furious. and this official was there many months before the operation began and didn't leave until it was over. he was experienced with atfs weapons tracking databases and the tracking system. he was also on the same floor as the fast an
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)